Wednesday, September 13, 2006

Blog Day

I subscribe to several blogs using bloglines.  This morning I had an update for Gluten Free Girl, http://glutenfreegirl.blogspot.com/ .  It said that it was posted Aug 31, so either my bloglines is working really slow, or she got busy and posted later than she had intended.  It seems like she has a lot going on right now, so I am guessing the later.  School started, right?
 
Anyway, this is relevant here because she mentioned me.  She is a rock-star in the gluten-free blogging world, so we might have more visitors today.  So, if you are here on Shauna's recommendation, welcome!
 
I explain what I am doing in the archives, but if you are new here, it is essentially this.  I want to bake foods that taste like the "real thing".  I want to do this as cheaply as possible.  I'm a science grad student, and don't have a lot of money to buy baking mixes and pre-made foods.  Jowar flour, from the Indian grocery, is the cheapest grain flour other than corn starch that I have found.  It is the right colour, and has a mild flavour.  It is even good for you, comparable to quinoa.  So, it's perfect for what I want.
 
The problem is, there aren't many recipes using it that don't also add lots of other things that I don't want to get into.  It doesn't need them.  So, I have to develop my own recipes.  Like Shauna said, you must create what you wish you could experience.  I'm currently interested in the effects of tapioca starch, but grad school hasn't given me much time in the test kitchen lately.
 
I'm the chemist, so I experiment with the baking, and my wife does most of the other cooking while I am at school.
 
Feel free to share any tips you have.
 
--Elwood City

 

1 comment:

  1. wheatlessbay10:50 PM

    Carol Fenster's "Wheat-free Recipes and Menus" (Avery, 1995, 2004) uses a few flour blends as the bases for some of her baked goods' recipes, and one of hese is a sorghum-cornflour blend.

    I used to be a chem grad, myself. The training helps with cooking, I find (solubility, polymerization, acids and bases, that sort of thing.)

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